Feedback on Children with Diabetes

Asian children eating healthily hispanics healthy eatingAfrican American Family eating healthily
Video from Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF)

TITLE: Teens taking on type 1 diabetes (1)diabetes type 1 and 2



About Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF).  

“JDRF is the leading global organization funding type 1 diabetes (T1D) research. Our strength lies in our exclusive focus and singular influence on the worldwide effort to end T1D.” (2)  You can read more about JDRF here on the link provided. (3)

family effects of diabetes

Diabetes in the 20 years and under group on the rise!

The article entitled, Diabetes is on the rise in America’s kids and the experts don’t know why and were printed on April 14, 2017. The emphasis of the article, written by Sean Rossman for USA TODAY, was placed on a new study highlighting newly diagnosed diabetics 20 years and younger from 2002-2012. The following 4 paragraphs are the closing ones in the article.

  1. “The study, published Friday in the New England Journal of Medicine, showed higher rates of diabetes diagnoses among minorities. Type 2 diabetes, which the CDC stated makes up about 90% to 95% of diagnosed diabetes cases, rose by 8.5% in Asian Americans ages 10-19. Blacks in the same age group saw a 6.3% increase, followed by a 3.1% bump in Hispanics and whites at fewer than a 1% increase.” (4)
  2.  “Hispanics saw the biggest rate increase of Type 1 diabetes with a 4.2% increase, followed by blacks at 2.2% and whites at 1.2%.” (5)
  3.  “In terms of gender, girls and women 10-19 saw a 6.2% increase in Type 2 diabetes, while men and boys of the same age experienced a 3.7% increase. Across all age groups, Type 1 diabetes increased 2.2% in males and 1.4% in females.” (6)
  4. “CDC epidemiologist Dr. Giuseppina Imperatore said those who develop diabetes at a young age are at risk of developing complications from the disease earlier, lowering their quality of life, shortening life expectancy and increasing health care costs.” (7)  You can view the entire article here including a 55-second video overview! (8)

Diabetes: A Brief Overview

no cure for type 1 diabetes

What is Diabetes?

Most experts and diabetic individuals would acknowledge diabetes is a lack of insulin and is prevalent in children and young adults but can develop at any age (type 1). Children and young adults have to take insulin for the remainder of their lives to survive with periods of low blood sugar level (hypoglycemia), a way of life. On the other hand, some individuals do not have enough insulin or the pancreas does not use it properly (type 2). Adults are mostly affected by type 2 diabetes. However, with more and more children and young adults becoming obese or overweight the type 2 diagnosis will increase among their age groups.


What role does insulin play in our everyday lives?


According to the Diabetes Research Institute Foundation at, “Insulin serves as a “key” to open your cells, to allow the glucose to enter — and allow you to use the glucose for energy.  Without insulin, there is no “key.”   So, the sugar stays — and builds up– in the blood. The result: the body’s cells starve from the lack of glucose.  and, if left untreated, the high level of “blood sugar” can damage eyes, kidneys, nerves, and the heart, and can also lead to coma and death”. 1

Naming Some of the other known types of diabetes!

There are other known types of diabetes, such as Gestational Diabetes, where women who did not have diabetes experience a high level of blood sugar during pregnancy. It must be emphasized this condition must be recognized and treated immediately or could cause significant health problems for mother and child/children. In general, blood sugar levels would return to normal after pregnancy. However, this is not always a guarantee.

Additional types of diabetes discovered according to the  Joslin Diabetes Center at latent autoimmune diabetes in adults (LADA). Think of LADA as a slowly progressing version of type 1 with some of the characteristics of type 2.  In fact, some people call it type 1.5. There’s more.  Type 1, 2, gestational diabetes and LADA are polygenic—this means that it takes the involvement of many genes to cause the disease.  But there are other, much rarer forms of diabetes that are monogenic, meaning a change in only one gene is responsible for the condition. There are two types of conditions in this category: Maturity-Onset Diabetes of the Young  (MODY) and Neonatal Diabetes Mellitus (NDM)”.2

Another form of diabetes is Prediabetes. The Mayo Clinic stated at, “Prediabetes means that your blood sugar level is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without lifestyle changes, people with prediabetes are very likely to progress to type 2 diabetes. If you have prediabetes, the long-term damage of diabetes — especially to your heart, blood vessels, and kidneys — may already be starting. Prediabetes affects adults and children. The same lifestyle changes that can help prevent progression to diabetes in adults might also help bring children’s blood sugar levels back to normal’.3